Proview
SHOPPING CART (EMPTY)

We accept:

ONLINE BOOKSTORE: POPULAR TITLES

Select a country of publication from the menu on the left or view popular titles from all jurisdictions below.

SUBJECT INDEX: Singapore
Mediation in Singapore: A Practical Guide (3rd Edition)

Mediation is a key pillar of the legal framework in Singapore, utilized both in a private setting and by the courts. This new edition of Mediation in Singapore provides comprehensive but practical detail of Mediation, written by industry heavyweights, General Editors, George Lim and Danny McFadden and contributed to by leading Singapore experts.

 
Criminal Appeals in Singapore

Criminal Appeals in Singapore is a comprehensive, practical and authoritative guide to the law and practice of criminal appeals in Singapore. This book provides a step-by-step account of criminal appeals for all the criminal courts in Singapore and includes flow charts for improved usability.  

 
Singapore Civil Procedure 2020

Helmed by Honourable Supreme Court Justice Chua Lee Ming, the Executive Director of Singapore Judicial College Paul Quan and authored by over 60 leading practitioners, the new edition of the Singapore White Book has been significantly updated to include changes over the last 12 months so you are fully prepared for new developments.

Defined by quality, no other text gives you clarity into Civil Procedure like the Singapore White Book.

 
Amendments to the SOP Act

The SOP Amendment Act
A Commentary on the Building and Construction Industry Security of Payment (Amendment) Act 2018

 

Since the passage of the Building and Construction Industry Security of Payment Act (Cap 30B) or the SOP Act in 2004, the dispute resolution landscape in the construction industry has changed considerably. Each year between 400 and 500 adjudication applications are lodged and the statutory adjudication process is now the

principal dispute resolution route for construction payment claim disputes.

In 2018, Parliament passed the Building and Construction Industry Security of Payment (Amendment) Act 2018. The Amendment Act raises important changes to the operation of the statutory adjudication regime, including changes to the scope of contracts which comes under the Act and the provision for the claimant to now apply for a review of an adjudication determination. This work addresses a number of important issues arising from the amendments.

The authors are senior adjudicators and general editors of the Singapore Construction Adjudication Review, an established series of reports on adjudication determinations since 2005.
 

 

SUBJECT INDEX: Malaysia
Trademarks Law in Malaysia: Cases and Commentary, Second Edition (COMING SOON)

Trademarks Law in Malaysia: Cases and Commentary, Second Edition is a revamped edition from the first book which was published in 2003. It continues to provide a comprehensive overview on the development, economic rationale as well as the role and functions of the trademark system in Malaysia.

 
Malaysian Specialist Intellectual Property and Construction Courts: Practice and Procedure (COMING SOON)

This is a professional guide on the practice and procedure at the specialist Intellectual Property and Constructions Courts of Malaysia. Intellectual property and construction cases are often considered as technical and complex, requiring in-depth understanding by the parties, their lawyers as well as judges too. 

 
Law and Practice of Injunctions in Malaysia (OUT NOW)

This book aims to explain the law, practice and procedure of injunctions in Malaysia. Written and edited by an eminent legal practitioner, in collaboration with a group of expert authores, this publication has been prepared with court lawyers in mind, specifically those with the challenging task of praying for (and prevailing upon the court to grant) relief in circumstances where damages are simply not an adequate remedy. 

 
Intellectual Property Law in Malaysia, Second Edition (OUT NOW)

This book is a detailed work that gives a distinctively Malaysian account of the six areas of law that are conventionally accepted as falling under the rubric of intellectual property: the law of passing off, registered trademarks, copyright, patents, registered industrial designs and confidential information. It provides a basic but comprehensive account of the substantive rules that govern these areas of intellectual property law, with the focus being essentially on the Malaysian position. In treating intellectual property law as a coherent whole, this book enables the inter-relationship and the similarities that exist between the different areas to be better appreciated.

 

 

SUBJECT INDEX: Hong Kong
Equity and Trusts in Hong Kong: Doctrines, Remedies and Institutions, 2nd Edition

• Discusses the worlds’ first detailed consideration of anti-Bartlett clauses by an appellate court in the Court of Final Appeal’s decision in Zhang Hong Li v DBS Bank (Hong Kong) Ltd [2019] HKCFA 45.
• Considers the fiduciary duty of trustees including the concept of a residual fiduciary duty after Zhang Hong Li v DBS Bank (Hong Kong) Ltd [2019] HKCFA 45.
• A chapter discussing the relationship between equity and unjust enrichment.
• Fresh consideration of the approach to property ownership disputes involving the doctrines of common intention constructive trust, proprietary estoppel, and the resurrection of the presumption of resulting trust after the privy council decisions of Marr v Collie (Bahamas) [2017] UKPC 17 and Whitlock v Moree (Bahamas) [2017] UKPC 44.
• Submission that the common law doctrine of sham should not apply to trusts, considering JSC Mezhdunarodniy Promyshlenniy Bank and another v Pugachev (Pugachev v. Pugachev) [2017] EWHC 2426 (Ch)
• Considers why Hong Kong has no need of the possible new doctrine of estoppel that may be developing in England after the English Court of Appeal decision in Pennington v. Waine [2002] EWCA Civ 227.
• A chapter considering the importance of special trust jurisdictions for trust business in Hong Kong, including Cayman Islands, British Virgin Islands and Bermuda.
 

 
Business Law in Hong Hong, 6th Edition

Business Law in Hong Kong continues to provide an analysis of the general principles relating to the laws of business and the legal system in Hong Kong 

 
The Hong Kong White Book 2021

Hong Kong White Book 2021 is Hong Kong’s most trusted court companion. When there are countless decisions to be made, opponents to handle, clients to manage and a myriad of courses you could follow, Hong Kong White Book 2021 is the source you can trust.

Authored by a talented pool of over 95 specialist practitioners, Hong Kong White Book 2021 continues to provide the most comprehensive coverage of matters relevant to civil procedure.

Key Highlights to the 2021 edition include:

Order 11
• The anti-suit injunction section of O.11 has been rewritten.

Order 24
• The court has made clear that Norwich Pharmacal applications must be made by way of originating summons
• The court will not make an order for production of a document that is not in existence
• The court has inherent jurisdiction to order specific discovery at any time (either before or after the commencement of proceedings) as an alternative to an application under s.41 of the High Court Ordinance or O.24 r.7A(1)
• Third-party disclosure under s.42 of the High Court Ordinance and O.24 r.7A(2) must be made by a party to existing proceedings but if the party can obtain the document without a court order, the court will refuse the discovery application
• The court will not make a discovery order if the litigant is able to obtain copies of those requested documents from a third party without a court order, and there is no evidence that such requests would have been refused by such third party (Jowers v Kinney [2019] HKCFI 2791, [2019] 5 H.K.L.R.D. 686, CFI)

Order 67
• The decision in Tang Siu Nam v Tang Chi Man [2019] 4 HKLRD 312 is discussed where the court highlighted the better use of O.67 r.5(1) particularly at a time when there is a downturn in the economy and therefore intervention and/or cessation of law firms may, sadly, be a more frequent occurrence.

Volume 3 Arbitration and ADR
The Arbitration and ADR volume of the White Book 2021 represents a comprehensive review of new case law that has emerged since the last edition, with important and concise updates on a number of significant developments, including incorporation of arbitration agreements by reference, anti-suit injunctions against third parties, staying arbitral proceedings in favour of winding-up proceedings, security for setting aside and serious irregularity challenges including remission of the award. In light of the new developments, the section on Article 8 regarding stays has been restructured.

Commentaries reflecting the latest developments under the Mediation Ordinance (Cap.620) are also included. The commentary on third party funding has been reviewed for easier reading and contains updates on relevant English case law for reference. 

 
IPO Handbook for Hong Kong 2020

IPO Handbook for Hong Kong 2020

A comprehensive handbook spanning the entire listing process

Asian Legal Business is proud to announce that it has published the 2020 edition of its popular Hong Kong IPO Handbook.

The handbook, which took a year to put together, covers a number of topics and chapters including Hong Kong dual-class shares, legal issues related to the listing of red chips, IPO application process, and tax consideration in an IPO, among others.

The list of contributors and supporting organizations include ACMI Asia Capital Markets Institute, Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, Appleby, BDO Hong Kong, Beijing DHH Law Firm, CLSA, CMB Wing Lung Bank, Commerce & Finance Law Offices, DeHeng Law Offices, Grandall Law Firm, iDeals Solutions, Jingtian & Gocheng, LC Lawyers, ONC Lawyers, Porda Havas, SWCS. Wisdom Investor Relations, ACC Hong Kong, and Hong Kong Investor Relations Association. 

To request for a complimentary digital copy of the handbook, click here to register now.

The handbook is also available for purchase at USD70 each. Limited copies are available. Order yours now!

 

 

SUBJECT INDEX: United Kingdom
Lindley & Banks on Partnership, 20Ed (Mainwork and 3rd Supplement)

Lindley & Banks on Partnership, 20th Edition gives you comprehensive, authoritative and practical coverage of the law relating to both general and limited partnerships. This seminal text on partnerships, first published in 1860, reflects the current editor’s wide practical experience in this area of law and gives you detailed commentary on all aspects of the life of a partnership, from its nature and formation to the usual contents of a partnership agreement and common areas of dispute, the liabilities undertaken by partners both internally and externally and, finally, to dissolution, winding up and insolvency. It also explains how partnerships are taxed. The twentieth edition covers all legal changes since the last edition, with reference to UK and Commonwealth authorities where relevant.
 
New to the 20th edition and latest supplement:
  • Explores partners’ statutory and other rights to information and access to books, the potential impact of the restraint of trade doctrine on the partnership agreement whilst the partnership continues and the interplay of the courts’ jurisdiction over partnerships with its powers under TOLATA 1996.
  • Considers the impact of cases such as Boghani v. Nathoo (on rights and duties under s.38 of the 1890 Act), Bates van Winkelhof v. Clyde & Co LLP (on the overlap of employment rights with partnership) and Hosking v. Marathon Asset Management LLP (on the equitable doctrine of forfeiture).
  • Includes a fully updated section on the regulation of solicitor partnerships
  • Analyses the implications of the decision in Wild v. Wild in identifying what is partnership property.
  • Notes the Scottish cases of Sheveleu v. Brown regarding the application of various provisions of the 1890 Act following a dissolution and Morrison v. Aberdein Considine & Co regarding the status of salaried partners.
  • Considers the nature of a partnership share in the light of the important decision of the Australian court in Rojoda Pty Ltd v Commissioner of State Revenue.
  • Explains the new income tax rules on expenses incurred by partners and the changes to entrepreneurs’ relief and the treatment of UK residents and non-resident for capital gains tax.
 
Shackleton on the Law and Practice of Meetings, 15th Edition

Shackleton on the Law and Practice of Meetings is a leading resource on the law and practice of company, charity and public sector meetings, providing a complete statement of the law with detailed practical guidance.
 
Features:
  • Discusses the legal implications of public and private meetings
  • Addresses the practical issues to be aware of when organising and managing meetings
  • Deals with specific forms of meeting such as board, committee, shareholder and public sector meetings
  • Explains different types of resolution and how these are passed in the context of meetings
  • Provides a guide as how to maintain good order and ensure fairness at meetings
  • Directs the reader to the appropriate statutory requirements under the Companies Act 2006 and other relevant legislation
  • Covers meetings of the various forms of charitable organisations
  • Considers the principles of natural justice and public sector equality duty and their outworkings in the context of information access and attendance at real and on-line meetings accessible by the general public
  • Provides ‘worked’ practice examples and checklists for company meetings
  • Looks at the powers, duties and roles of directors in the context of meetings
  • Provides guidance on the conduct of all tiers of local government meetings
  • Explains how to access information
What’s New
  • Accessibility requirements to meetings of public sector bodies including the application of The Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018 and the draft Local Government and Elections (Wales) Bill 2020
  • Remote meetings arising from, the effects of the Coronavirus (CV-19) Pandemic and their outworkings through the Coronavirus Act 2020 and the Local Authorities and Police and Crime Panels (Coronavirus) (Flexibility of Local Authority and Police and Crime Panel Meetings) (England and Wales) Regulations 2020

 

 
Shareholders' Agreements, 8th Edition

Shareholders’ Agreements provides practical guidance on the nature and effect of shareholders’ agreements and articles of association. The new edition has been substantially updated to provide more practical guidance on drafting shareholders’ agreements and other related documentation through the use of detailed drafting notes. The title includes precedents, articles of association for private companies limited by shares. It also comes with a CD-ROM to make drafting quick and easy.

  • Offers in-depth analysis on the key components of shareholders’ agreements and articles of association, enabling you to draft these documents with confidence
  • Analyses the elements of joint ventures and property joint ventures so you are aware of the possible structures and have the tools you need to draft the relevant documents
  • Provides information on taxation considerations in relation to this area
  • Reflects recent changes in market practice in private equity transactions
  • Covers the theory behind partnership structures
  • Explains boilerplate provisions
  • Offers expert commentary on option agreements and warrants with detailed drafting notes, so you can draft these types of agreements and are aware of the key issues
  • Includes a CD-ROM of all precedents for easy drafting
New to the 8th edition:
  • Precedents and accompanying commentary revised and updated to take account of current practice and thinking
  • Updated chapters on related law and taxation
  • A new chapter on directors' duties and their interaction with shareholder rights
  • New precedent optional provisions for use with the main precedent documents.
 
Clerk & Lindsell on Torts 23rd Edition

Clerk & Lindsell on Torts, one of our flagship titles and part of the Common Law Library series, is an essential reference tool which is widely referred to by practitioners and cited by the judiciary. It offers the most comprehensive coverage of the subject, providing the end user with indispensable access to current, frequent and unrivalled authoritative information on all aspects of tort law.
  • Provides unrivalled breadth and depth of coverage on all areas of tort law
  • Sets out the general principles of liability and causation
  • Explains the general defences, such as claimant’s wrongdoing, contributory negligence, consent and assumption of risk, exclusion of liability and miscellaneous defences
  • Covers all areas of tort, from joint liability and vicarious liability to capacity and parties, from negligence to breach of statutory duty and professional liability, and from product liability and occupiers’ liability to employers’ liability and public service liability
  • Deals with important areas from malicious prosecution to wrongful interference with goods, from deceit to trespass of land and dispossession, from animals’ liability to nuisance and Rylands v Fletcher, and from malicious falsehood to economic torts
  • Discusses statutory IP rights, passing off and breach of confidence and privacy
  • Includes a fully updated chapter on Defamation
  • Deals extensively with damages
  • Covers injunctions and limitation periods
  • Includes discussion of self-help and discharge of torts
  • Considers relevant human rights issues
New to this edition from the Supreme Court:
  • Robinson v Chief Constable of West Yorkshire on the duty of care owed by the police to members of the public when effecting an arrest of a suspected offender; and, together with Poole BC v GN, on the role of the “Caparo tripartite test” for the existence of a duty of care, stressing the importance of taking an incremental approach to novel negligence claims
  • Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis v DSD holding that policy arguments about the risk of defensive policing or the diversion of resources from police work to compensation claims were not relevant to whether the police owe an operational duty under ECHR art.3 when investigating criminal offences and that serious defects in the investigation of crimes of violence could amount to a breach of that duty
  • Dryden v Johnson Matthey Plc on the meaning of “damage” in personal injury claims
  • Steel v NRAM Ltd (formerly NRAM Plc) on the duty of care owed by a solicitor to a third party in claims for negligent misrepresentation
  • JSC BTA Bank v Khrapunov on what constitutes “unlawful means” for the purposes of the tort of conspiracy
  • R. (on the application of Haralambous) v St Albans Crown Court holding that there is no obligation to disclose to the party affected by a search warrant the material upon which the magistrates relied when deciding to grant the warrant
  • Perry v Raleys Solicitors on the correct approach to a “lost chance” claim against solicitors, approving Maples Group Ltd v Simmons & Simmons; and Edwards v Hugh James Ford Simey on the use of evidence which had become available after the date of the lost claim in assessing the strength of that claim
  • WM Morrison Supermarkets plc v Various Claimants on the interpretation of “the close connection test” for the purpose of vicarious liability; and Barclays Bank plc v Various Claimants on the limits of that test
  • Vedanta Resources plc v Lungowe on the potential liability of a parent company in relation to the activities of its subsidiaries
  • Darnley v Croydon Health Services NHS Trust on the duty of care owed by an Accident and Emergency department receptionist to a patient
  • Lachaux v Independent Print Ltd on the requirement introduced by the Defamation Act 2013 that a claimant have suffered “serious harm” to reputation
  • Stocker v Stocker on the correct approach to determining the meaning of words posted to a social media site (Facebook) for the purposes of the tort of defamation
  • James-Bowen v Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis holding that an employer does not owe a duty of care to employees to defend a civil action against the employer in a manner that protects the employees from economic or reputational harm
  • Playboy Club London Ltd v Banca Nazionale Del Lavoro SpA on the Hedley Byrne duty of care owed by a bank when giving a credit reference to an agent of a casino, where the bank had no knowledge of the casino
  • Morris-Garner v One Step (Support) Ltd on the assessment of damages in lieu of an injunction under Lord Cairns’ Act, and holding that “negotiating damages” (previously referred to as “Wrotham Park damages”) are compensatory and not intended to remove gains from the defendant
  • R. (on the application of Jalloh (formerly Jollah)) v Secretary of State for the Home Department on the relationship between the tort of false imprisonment the concept of deprivation of liberty within art.5 of the European Convention on Human Rights
  • R (on the application of Hemmati) v Secretary of State for the Home Department on a claimant’s entitlement to substantial, as opposed to nominal, damages for false imprisonment where the policy under which the claimant was detained was unlawful
  • Singularis Holdings Ltd (In Liquidation) v Daiwa Capital Markets Europe Ltd holding that there is no rule that, where a company is suing a third party in tort, the fraudulent conduct of a sole director will be automatically attributed to the company
  • Tiuta International Ltd (In Liquidation) v De Villiers Chartered Surveyors Ltd on the liability of a valuer where a lender advances monies against over-valued security and part of those monies goes to pay off old indebtedness to the same lender
  • R. (Mott) v Environment Agency on a fisherman’s rights under art.1 Protocol 1 of the ECHR
  • XX v Whittington Hospital NHS Trust where the claimant was entitled to recover the reasonable costs of entering commercial surrogacy arrangements abroad, although such arrangements would be contrary to the Surrogacy Arrangements Act 1985
  • Re D (a child) (residence order: deprivation of liberty) holding that a parent could not authorise the detention of a 16- or 17-year old minor who lacked capacity that would amount to a deprivation of liberty
  • Welsh Ministers v PJ imposing conditions in a community treatment order which would amount to a deprivation of the patient’s liberty would breach art.5 ECHR
  • Secretary of State for Justice v MM neither the tribunal nor the Secretary of State are permitted to impose conditions amounting to detention or a deprivation of liberty, in relation to a conditionally discharged restricted patient, even if the patient consented
  • An NHS Trust v Y on the withdrawal of clinically assisted nutrition and hydration from a patient with a prolonged disorder of consciousness
  • Cartier International v British Telecommunications Plc which held that trade mark owners must indemnify ISPs against the cost of complying with a blocking injunction